Research projects


Reconstructing Holocene climate-biosphere links in South America

Corinne at enterance of tamboril cave, brazil

Corinne at enterance of tamboril cave, brazil

Constraining the role of hydroclimate variability in late Holocene vegetation dynamics in South America requires reconstruction of the response of local climate to variability in regional climate. Development of oxygen and strontium isotope records from speleothem enable assessment of the extent to which local moisture conditions were coupled to variations in the South American Monsoon System. Read more about this research in our 2016 AGU abstract (link).


Why was the western U.S. drier during past warm intervals?

Figure from Wong et al., in review, Nature Geoscience

Figure from Wong et al., in review, Nature Geoscience

A paleoclimate data-model investigation to delineate the climate processes responsible for the teleconnection between temperature in the North Atlantic and moisture conditions over the western U.S. Results have implications for better understanding how and why moisture conditions across the region will change with on-going climate change.  Read more about this research in our 2016 manuscript (link)


Reconstructing Holocene hydroclimate of Texas

2011 Texas Drought resulted in 9 billion dollars of agricultural damages. Image link.

2011 Texas Drought resulted in 9 billion dollars of agricultural damages. Image link.

Texas is a semi-arid region subject to severe and frequent drought. To better understand how moisture conditions might change with on-going climate change, we investigate the nature of, and controls on, past climate through the use of climate reconstruction from speleothems and paleoclimate models. Read more about this research in our 2016 Fall AGU Meeting abstracts (link and link).


Urban stream water quality

Cover image of thematic issue on Urban Geochemistry in Elements (Dec 2012).

Cover image of thematic issue on Urban Geochemistry in Elements (Dec 2012).

Geochemical and isotopic characterization of spatio-temporal variation of urban streams combined with water-rock interaction and source water mixing models is used to delineate anthropogenic controls on water compositions. Read more about this research in our 2016 Annual GSA Meeting abstract (link)